18.36.54 House by Daniel Libeskind

miss-design.com-libeskind-11

I’ve never seen a house like this before !

The living space of this Connecticut residence is formed by a spiraling ribbon of 18 planes, defined by 36 points connected by 54 lines. This pure and dynamic architectural form generates distinctive interior spaces while dramatically framing both near and distant landscape scenes. Large glass planes virtually disappear within the ribbon, allowing unimpeded picturesque views of 18th century hay meadows and giant oaks. Circulation through kitchen, living, dining, and sleeping areas is seamless and free-flowing, as is the distinction between interior and exterior space. Challenging both traditional and modern notions of ‘the house in the landscape,’ this design gives nothing of itself up to its natural setting, but selectively incorporates the elements therein for the enhancement of both house and landscape.

http://daniel-libeskind.com

Humble Pied

Humble Pied is a collection of creative professional advice in an on-going project where the formula is quite simple: one awesome creative type sharing one simple and inspirational tip. All over iChat.

Love it ! Here are some of my favourites;

Jessica Hische -  “The work you do while you procrastinate is probably the work you should be doing for the rest of your life. ”

Liz Danzico – “Celebrate your lack of plan”

Alissa Walker – “Ignore your job title”

Scanwiches

tumblr_lni0muyYYg1qzx4mbo1_1280

I’m not sure what made Jon Chonko – Scanwiches founder, creator and eater – scan his first sandwich in 2009, but since them he has documented them all on his website Scanwiches.

Feeling hungry ?

Touch Wood

This sensational mobile telephone advert, created by Japanese ad agency Drill Inc. for NTT Docomo’s Touch Wood SH-08C handset, features a giant wooden marimba, hand-built in the woods of Kyushu, Japan. As the ball rolls down the installation in this 3-minute video, Bach’s Cantana 147 is played out.

Stunning.

What Made Steve Jobs So Great?

Steve_Jobs_portrait_by_tumb

Originally written after his resignation in August and re-released following the sad news on Weds of his passing, this piece on Fast Co Design is a great article and tribute to the amazing contribution of Steve Jobs.

“Steve Jobs wasn’t an engineer or a designer. But he was one of the greatest users of technology of all time, and that made all the difference.”

“People often say that Jobs is, first and foremost, a great explainer of technology–a charismatic, plainspoken salesman who is able to bend those around him into a “reality distortion field.” But charisma can be bent to all sorts of purposes. Those purposes may very well be asinine. So what gives his plain-speaking such force? He always talks about how wonderous it will be to use something, to actually live with it and hold it in your hands. If you listen to Steve Jobs’s presentations over the years, he comes across not as the creator of a product so much as its very first fan–the first person to digest its possibilities.”

“Perhaps the best example of this hides in plain sight, and is a fundamental part of every Apple product. All throughout the 1970s to the 1990s, if you ever opened up a new gadget the first thing you were ever faced with was figuring how the damn thing worked. To solve that, you’d have to wade through piles of instruction manuals written in an engineer’s alien English. But a funny thing happened with the iMac: Every year after, Apple’s instruction manuals grew thinner and thinner, until finally, today, there are none. The assumption is that you’ll be able to tear open the box and immediately start playing with your new toy. Just watch a 3-year-old playing with an iPad. You’re seeing a toddler intuit the workings of one of the most advanced pieces of engineering on the planet. At almost no time in history has that ever been possible. It certainly wasn’t when the first home computers were introduced, or the first TV remotes, or the first radios. And it was something he was driving for, his entire career. Again from 1989, Inc. asked him, “Do you sometimes marvel at the effect you’ve had on people’s lives?” And Jobs said: “There are some moments. I was in an elementary school just this morning, and they still had a bunch of Apple IIs, and I was kind of looking over their shoulders. Then I get letters from people about the Mac, saying, ‘I never thought I could use a computer before I tried this one.’”

Read more here.

Dev Harlan

Dev Harlan is a multidisciplinary artist whose hybrid practice combines the physical and the virtual with the use of sculpture, light and projection.

(via Human Resources)

Dev Harlan – “Parmenides I”, 2011 - Foam, wood, plaster, video projection

Makeshift Magazine on Kickstarter

Another interesting project on the wonderful Kickstarter.

Makeshift is a quarterly magazine and multimedia website about creativity in unlikely places, from the favelas of Rio to the alleys of Delhi. These are environments where resources may be scarce, but where ingenuity is used incessantly for survival, enterprise, and a self-expression. Makeshift is about people, the things they make, and the context they make them in.

Wildlife Photography by Troy Moth

397b-photography7

Troy Moth was born in a remote tree-planting camp on the west coast of Canada and spent the first few years of life in a tent guarded by large dogs. He loved the wild and abundant nature he grew up immersed in, but eventually the call to adventure became too much and he moved, first across Canada to the big city (Toronto), then across the world to India, to pursue a career in photography.

(via The Inspiration Grid)

Yang Lan: The generation that’s remaking China

Yang Lan, a journalist and entrepreneur who’s been called “the Oprah of China,” offers insight into the next generation of young Chinese citizens — urban, connected (via microblogs) and alert to injustice.

 

Steve Jobs: In His Own Words

On life:

“Remembering that I’ll be dead soon is the most important tool I’ve ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life. Because almost everything – all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure – these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important. Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart.”

On Design:

“Design is a funny word. Some people think design means how it looks. But of course, if you dig deeper, it’s really how it works. The design of the Mac wasn’t what it looked like, although that was part of it. Primarily, it was how it worked. To design something really well, you have to get it. You have to really grok what it’s all about. It takes a passionate commitment to really thoroughly understand something, chew it up, not just quickly swallow it. Most people don’t take the time to do that.”

“In most people’s vocabularies, design means veneer. It’s interior decorating. It’s the fabric of the curtains and the sofa. But to me, nothing could be further from the meaning of design. Design is the fundamental soul of a man-made creation that ends up expressing itself in successive outer layers of the product or service.”

On Instinct

“You can’t connect the dots looking forward; you can only connect them looking backwards. So you have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future. You have to trust in something – your gut, destiny, life, karma, whatever. This approach has never let me down, and it has made all the difference in my life.”

On Work

“Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work. And the only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking. Don’t settle. As with all matters of the heart, you’ll know when you find it. And, like any great relationship, it just gets better and better as the years roll on. So keep looking until you find it. Don’t settle.”

(via The Guardian)

Parasite Lamp by Yiannis Ghikas

paraliste_lamp_yiannis_ghikas_3b-thumb-468x468-32940

This table lamp would look great in my office.

Yiannis Ghikas directs light downwards as well as upwards using a clever directional addition to the lampshade. Says Ghikas, “Once upon a time there was a lamp called Ordinary. One day, it contracted a parasite that began leaching light, sending it to places that Ordinary couldn’t even imagine. Since that day, Ordinary and its parasite friend lived happily ever after.”

(via Moco Loco)

Draw In Light by We Are Useful

390d-design

Love this beautiful packaging for Draw In Light. Designed by London based studio We Are Useful.

“We were approached by ‘Draw In Light’ to create the branding for their new womenswear label. We created an identity based around the idea of light and crystals that ran from the logo to the imagery for the AW/10 collection. We art directed, photographed, retouched, designed and produced a look book which incorporated an exclusive numbered screen printed poster.”

(via The Inspiration Grid)


Share

Aaron Melander

PORT_chalet_11_campaign6_2048

Really great project from Aaron Melander.

“Each year for the annual Winter X Games in Aspen, Target hosts their competing athletes at the Target Chalet. Inspired by the spirit of the mountain man, we created a rugged abode that would be a place for Shaun White and Simon Dumont to crash after a day of competition.”

Frank Chimero: The Setup

5364515133_06616ea368_b

A wonderful introduction to the preferred setup of Frank Chimero. Some lessons for us all to learn here.

 

“You know what I’ve learned? A person only flails around in regards to their rig when they don’t have a clear idea of what constitutes their work. Suitability and fit is paramount, and one is never going to find what they’re looking for if they don’t know what they need. So, I looked at my work, I watched how I used my computer for a day, and found out all I do is draw vector shapes, surf the web, listen to music, and bash words out in plain text. That’s hardly the type of activity that requires computational brute force, though I understand there are some of you out there that require just that. Not me though. Nope.

And these computers? As much as I love fiddle-faddling with the damn things, I mostly just want to forget I have one and get on with saying stuff and making things. I realized that I valued freedom more than power, flexibility more than blazing speed. I want the choice of being able to be mobile, and to carry around my whole setup with me at all times without much inconvenience.”

Read more here.

The Story of Vivian Maier

53-292

The story of Vivian Maier, a nanny who has now wowed the world with her photography, and who incidentally recorded some of the most interesting marvels and peculiarities of Urban America in the second half of the twentieth century is seemingly beyond belief.

An American of French and Austro-Hungarian extraction, Vivian bounced between Europe and the United States before coming back to New York City in 1951. Having picked up photography just two years earlier, she would comb the streets of the Big Apple refining her artistic craft. By 1956 Vivian left the East Coast for Chicago, where she’d spend most of the rest of her life working as a caregiver. In her leisure Vivian would shoot photos that she zealously hid from the eyes of others. Taking snapshots into the late 1990?s, Maier would leave behind a body of work comprising over 100,000 negatives. Additionally Vivian’s passion for documenting extended to a series of homemade documentary films and audio recordings. Interesting bits of Americana, the demolition of historic landmarks for new development, the unseen lives of ethnics and the destitute, as well as some of Chicago’s most cherished sites were all meticulously catalogued by Vivian Maier.

A free spirit but also a proud soul, Vivian became poor and was ultimately saved by three of the children she had nannied earlier in her life. Fondly remembering Maier as a second mother, they pooled together to pay for an apartment and took the best of care for her. Unbeknownst to them, one of Vivian’s storage lockers was auctioned off due to delinquent payments. In those storage lockers lay the massive hoard of negatives Maier secretly stashed throughout her lifetime.

Maier’s massive body of work would come to light when in 2007 her work was discovered at a local thrift auction house on Chicago’s Northwest Side. From there, it would eventually impact the world over and change the life of the man who championed her work and brought it to the public eye, John Maloof.

Currently, Vivian Maier’s body of work is being archived and cataloged for the enjoyment of others and for future generations. John Maloof is at the core of this project after reconstructing most of the archive, having been previously dispersed to the various buyers attending that auction. Now, with roughly 90% of her archive reconstructed, Vivian’s work is part of a renaissance in interest in the art of Street Photography.

View more of her wonderful photographs here.

Share