Baitogogo by Henrique Oliveira

Baitogogo by Henrique Oliveira

Baitogogo by Henrique Oliveira is a large Gordian Knot installation in Palais de Tokyo, Paris.

Through a kind of architectural anthropomorphism, Henrique Oliveira reveals the building’s structure. At Palais de Tokyo, he plays on the space’s existing and structuring features, prolonging and multiplying pillars in order to endow them with a vegetable and organic dimension, as though the building were coming alive. The artist draws inspiration from medical textbooks, amongst others, and particularly from studies of physical pathologies such as tumors. Through a formal analogy, these outgrowths evoke the outermost layers of the bark of a common tree. The texture of this wooden tapumes installation inevitably calls to mind certain tree essences from Amazonian, humid tropical forests: the rivulets and other nodes constitute uncontrollable networks, in a logic that Man can no longer suppress.

Baitogogo by Henrique Oliveira

Baitogogo by Henrique Oliveira

Baitogogo by Henrique Oliveira

Baitogogo by Henrique Oliveira

In The Absence Of War

In The Absence Of War

In The Absence Of War by Ole Ukena.

What seems to be a green peace flag from far away reveals itself as a massive war zone filled with 20.000 toy soldiers when approaching the piece. Where the soldiers don’t  stand the peace sign is revealed, each side of the dyptichon contributing equal part of the well known symbol.

In The Absence Of War

In The Absence Of War

In The Absence Of War

In The Absence Of War

Trust by Ole Ukena

oleukena_trust4

Trust, an installation by conceptual artist Ole Ukena.

Over 15.000 nails are hammered on top of a wooden structure that evokes references to the beds of indian fakirs. Not all nails are facing with the sharp side up, some are turned upside down reflecting the light in a different way and creating this way the appearance of the word trust. The act of turning the nails upside down can be read as a metaphor for changing the perspective towards things that cause pain. In this piece what potentially hurts becomes a supporting structure. Where one trusts it doesn‘t hurt.

Trust, an installation by conceptual artist Ole Ukena.

Trust, an installation by conceptual artist Ole Ukena.

Trust, an installation by conceptual artist Ole Ukena.

oleukena_trust4

Reverse of Volume by Yasuaki Onishi

Reverse of Volume by Yasuaki Onishi

Artist Yasuaki Onishi uses translucent sheets of plastic and black hot glue to create a cave like chamber for his installation Reverse of Volume. More here.

In his installation, reverse of volume RG, Yasuaki Onishi uses the simplest materials — plastic sheeting and black hot glue — to create a monumental, mountainous form that appears to float in space. The process that he calls ?casting the invisible? involves draping the plastic sheeting over stacked cardboard boxes, which are then removed to leave only their impressions. This process of ?reversing? sculpture is Onishi’s meditation on the nature of the negative space, or void, left behind.

Onishi wanted to create an installation that would change as visitors approached and viewed it from outside of the glass wall to inside the gallery space. Seen through the glass, the undulating, exterior surface and dense layers of vertical black strands are primarily visible. At first glance, standing in the center of the gallery’s foyer, it appears to be a suspended, glowing mass whose exact depth is difficult to perceive. Upon entering the gallery and walking along the left or the right side, the installation transforms into an airy opening that can be entered. Almost like stepping into an inner sanctum or cave-like chamber, the semi-translucent plastic sheeting and wispy strands of hot glue envelop the viewer in a fragile, tent-like enclosure speckled with inky black marks. Visitors can walk in and out of the contemplative space, observing how the simplest qualities of light, shape, and line change.

Reverse of Volume by Yasuaki Onishi

Reverse of Volume by Yasuaki Onishi

Reverse of Volume by Yasuaki Onishi

Reverse of Volume by Yasuaki Onishi

Les Cordes by Mathieu Lehanneur

Les Cordes by Mathieu Lehanneur

Les Cordes, a lighting installation by French designer Mathieu Lehanneur, illuminates the interior of Château Borély, Marseille. The rope of light crossing the ceiling gives an impression of movement as each luminous cord is powered individually and as the light intensity of each is gradually adjusted it appears as if a gentle breeze is blowing.

The structure of the design inconspicuously integrates the building only revealing traces of light which appear to embroider the building itself. It is not an object. It is not a light fitting. It is the light itself that seems to live and circulate in the entrance space, as if stitched onto the building itself.

(via Ignant)

Les Cordes by Mathieu Lehanneur

Les Cordes by Mathieu Lehanneur

Les Cordes by Mathieu Lehanneur

Curious Perspectives

Curious Perspectives

Curious Perspectives by James Nizam.

Curious Perspectives, James Nizam’s third solo exhibition at Birch Libralato, opens with a title aptly borrowed from French mathematician Jean François Niceron’s 1638 treatise on the practical applications of perspective. As in La Perspective Curieuse, Nizam’s work demonstrates an affinity for natural magic: an alchemy of position and perspective, light and shadow, and of temporality, sequence, and technique. Just as Niceron held that optics are as much concerned with illusion as they are with the distinct properties of light, Nizam’s work occupies a complex physical and temporal space where perspective is both, a precise science and a natural magic. It is exactly here, in Nizam’s own view, that the unique position of the lens in time and space may capture our curiosity. “Curious”, then, does not regard the optical trick but, instead, evokes imaginary perspectives; immaterial and material coalesce in a series of photographic works – each carrying a quality of the impossible.

Curious Perspectives

Curious Perspectives

Curious Perspectives

Curious Perspectives

Master Plan by Chad Wright

Chad Wright – Master Plan

Master Plan, an installation from Chad Wright.

I was raised in Orange County—a sprawling suburb of Southern California built by disciples of Levittown. We lived in a tract house, a symbol of the American Dream, just like our neighbors. Dad, a realtor, and mom, a preschool teacher, met while working at JCPenneys in 1970. We spent our summers in Breezy Point, New York, at the yellow beach bungalow that my grandma Stella bought with war bonds, unknown to grandpa who was stationed in Iwo Jima soon after they eloped. As children, my big brother Christopher and I would build cities in the sand, beneath the bungalow’s slatted porch floorboards.

In a series titled Master Plan, I am conflating a child’s sandcastle with architecture typifying postwar American suburbia. This three-part series culls artifacts from my childhood, investigating suburbia in its vision and legacy. Phase One focuses on the mass-produced tract house, re-examining it as symbol for the model American Dream.

Chad Wright – Master Plan

Chad Wright – Master Plan

Chad Wright – Master Plan

Lives of Grass: Living Sculptures by Mathilde Roussel

mathilde-roussel-sculpture-07

Lives of Grass is a series of living sculptures by French artist Mathilde Roussel. Each is made of recycled metal and fabric filled with soil and wheat grass seeds.

Mathilde Roussel’s work is a sensible and symbolic research about the nature of physical life. She is interested in the cyclic metamorphoses that transform organic matter, whether vegetable, animal or human. Through her sculptures, installations or drawings, Roussel interrogates the ways in which time weighs on our body, leaving its traces as an imprint and thus creating an invisible archive of our emotions, a mute history of our existence. Skin becomes paper while our cells transform into graphite particles and our muscular tissues in thin membrane of flayed rubber. Her work becomes a mapping of the body, an anatomy of our fragile presence in the world.

Lives of Grass: Living Sculptures by Mathilde Roussel

Lives of Grass: Living Sculptures by Mathilde Roussel

Lives of Grass: Living Sculptures by Mathilde Roussel

mathilde-roussel-sculpture-06

mathilde-roussel-sculpture-07

Derek Paul Boyle

boyle07

Interesting work from Derek Paul Boyle.

I am interested in the power of contradiction, the lure of anticipation, and incompatible states of the self – what was once bound is made free, the known made unknown. In a wavering step between angst and serenity, fear and pleasure, I want to give form to anxiety, a shape to tension.

(via Ignant)

Derek Paul Boyle

Derek Paul Boyle

boyle03

boyle05

boyle06

boyle07

Planting Poetry

PLANTING_POETRY_7_LARGE

Planting Poetry is a series of col­or­ful, typo­graphic sculp­tures that were cre­ated by Burgess Studio for the Ministry of Stories, a char­ity that aims to inspire young peo­ple through cre­ative writ­ing. Founded by Nick Hornby, Lucy Macnab & Ben Payne, and operating out of the Hoxton Street Monster Supplies shop, they run workshops and provide one to one mentoring to local children. Brilliant.

Mesostic poems have one word running downwards, usually the title of the poem, and each line has to intersect it. They are surprisingly hard to write. During a week long workshop in St Mary’s Secret Garden in East London, the children devised their mesostic poems, with some help from professional writers and poets. Once complete, the poems were submitted to us for installation in the garden a week later. We were clear that we didn’t want to make anything that looked too much like a sign. Signs in gardens are normally negative – keep off the grass, no ball games. So, no rectangles. Also something that expressed the specific nature of a mesostic poem – that the lines extend out unevenly from either side of the vertical title, (they are not aligned or centred) and that everything revolves around that title.

Planting Poetry

Planting Poetry

Planting Poetry

PLANTING_POETRY_6_LARGE

PLANTING_POETRY_7_LARGE

Artist Crushes Entire Amusement Park into a Giant Cube

Pictures18

Once is a large-scale installation conceived by artist James Dive of The Glue Society for this year’s Sculpture by the Sea event in Aarhus, Denmark. The giant sculpture was created by compacting an entire amusement park, including rides, bumper cars and even prizes into a four metre cube.

The project is about the finality of a missed moment. Creating it was undoubtedly the most violent process I’ve ever embarked upon.

(via Junk Culture)

Artist Crushes Entire Amusement Park into a Giant Cube

Pictures18

426600_518258248221817_1621842907_n

Artist Crushes Entire Amusement Park into a Giant Cube

Solarium by William Lamson

william-lamson07

Solarium by William Lamson, an experimental greenhouse set in open landscape.

Like a mountain chapel or Thoreau’s one-room cabin, Solarium references a tradition of isolated outposts designed for reflection. Each of the 162 panels is made of sugar cooked to different temperatures and then sealed between two panes of window glass. The space functions as both an experimental greenhouse, growing three species of miniature citrus trees, and a meditative environment. In warm months, a 5×8 ft panel on each side of the house opens up to allow viewers to enter and exit the house from all directions. In addition to creating a pavilion like environment, this design references the architecture of a plant leaf, where the stomata opens and closes to help regulate the plants temperature. Set within the open the landscape, the house functions as a hybrid sanctuary at once evoking a plant conservatory, a chapel, and zen garden.

(via Faith is Torment)

Solarium by William Lamson

Solarium by William Lamson

Solarium by William Lamson

Solarium by William Lamson

william-lamson06

william-lamson07

Sound Installation by Zimoun

Zimoun©_IMG_5329_800px-4f7cb5ef

Sound artist Zimoun recently completed work on an ambitious project; a towering sound installation inside an abandoned toluene tank in Dottikon, Switzerland. The permanent installation uses 329 cotton balls attached to motors and to the inner tank walls. The result is a rhythmic soundscape that is completely camouflaged within an old factory. Interesting.

Using simple and functional components, Zimoun builds architecturally-minded platforms of sound. Exploring mechanical rhythm and flow in prepared systems, his installations incorporate commonplace industrial objects. In an obsessive display of simple and functional materials, these works articulate a tension between the orderly patterns of Modernism and the chaotic forces of life. Carrying an emotional depth, the acoustic hum of natural phenomena in Zimoun’s minimalist constructions effortlessly reverberates.

(via Boooooom)

Sound Installation

Sound Installation

Sound Installation

Zimoun©_IMG_5316_800px-69bde794

Zimoun 2013

Zimoun 2013

Zimoun 2013

The Free Little Library by Stereotank

library-7

Recently installed in New York’s Nolita neighborhood the Free Little Library is a temporary outdoor shelving unit that functions as a free library. The library was designed by Venezuelan design firm Stereotank as part of a collaboration with the Architectural League of New York and the Pen World Voices Festival who have selected 10 designers to build miniature free libraries in downtown Manhattan through September. Brilliant.

(via Colossal)

 The Free Little Library by Stereotank

 The Free Little Library by Stereotank

 The Free Little Library by Stereotank

 The Free Little Library by Stereotank

library-5

library-6

library-7

Ballroom Luminoso – Recycled Bike Part Chandeliers

742

Ballroom Luminoso is a series of six brilliantly lit, color changing chandeliers by artists Joe O’Connell and Blessing Hancock currently installed in San Antonio, Texas.

Drawing from the formal elegance of the freeway underpass and the cultural currents of the surrounding neighborhoods, the piece transforms a forgotten space into one that connects the community. Each globe contains a custom-designed LED light fixture, which casts sharply detailed overlapping shadows. The chandeliers paint the underpass with complex color patterns and ethereal lighting thereby refashioning the space into a majestic ballroom-cum-shadow theater. Melding grandeur with a sense of neighborhood rejuvenation, the sculptures weld recycled bike parts into refined forms.

Ballroom Luminoso references the area’s past, present, and future in the design of its intricately detailed medallions. The images in the medallions draw on the community’s agricultural history, strong Hispanic heritage, and burgeoning environmental movement. The medallions are a play on the iconography of La Loteria, which has become a touchstone of Hispanic culture. Utilizing traditional tropes like La Escalera (the Ladder), La Rosa (the Rose), and La Sandía (the Watermelon), the piece alludes to the neighborhood’s farming roots and horticultural achievements. Each character playfully rides a bike acting as a metaphor for the neighborhood’s environmental progress, its concurrent eco-restoration projects, and its developing cycling culture.

Ballroom Luminoso

Ballroom Luminoso

Ballroom Luminoso

Ballroom Luminoso

552

648

742

Sohlbergplassen Viewpoint by C-V. Holmebakk

Sohlbergplassen_F_07_M

Sohlbergplassen Viewpoint by C-V. Hølmebakk.

The Norwegian painter Harald Sohlberg (1869-1935) stayed in the Rondane mountain area for several years to do studies for his most famous work, Winter Night in the Mountains. The motif was a summation of sketches from several standpoints. The most recognisable position was close to where the viewpoint platform is built today.

The dark silhouette of pine trees in the foreground is a significant quality of the painting, framing the almost luminescent winter landscape. Also today the site has a certain dynamic quality, between the densely growing pine trees on the hill side and the distant mountains. This relation became the starting point for the geometry and the structure of the platform.

Several tests were executed by placing a ladder up against the tree trunks, trying to find the best views and interesting spaces between the trees. After the trees and topography were digitally registered, the form of the platform could be defined precisely in such a way that no trees had to be cut. It was also crucial to find a foundation system that would not destroy any roots. The ground in the area was frost-free at 2.7 meters – any traditional foundation would imply substantial excavation, and cut down of most of the trees.

In early stages of the project, the platform had a somewhat flexible construction made in steel. The pillars would have “snowshoes” resting on the ground, allowing the structure to move along with the frost heave. Load tests on a 3D-model were done by the structural engineer, and showed that the curved beams would collapse when strained by snow and movements in the ground. The structure was then changed to concrete, and a torsion stiff connection between the curved beams and the floor plane could be established.

The beam along the periphery of the platform also works as a railing. The beam rests on thin steel core pillars, drilled to rock, some places more than 12 meters below the ground. The rectangular openings in the floor allow rain and sunlight to get down to the terrain. A staircase leads to the space underneath the platform and further down the hill to the lake.

The floor has a hardly noticeable tilt outwards (0.3 meters) giving a slight feeling of being pulled towards the view. The movement between the pine trees, from the road towards the beautiful mountain motif, became an architectural answer to the artist’s interpretation – already evident in the painting.

(via This is Paper)

Sohlbergplassen Viewpoint

Sohlbergplassen_F_07_M

Sohlbergplassen_F_06_M

Sohlbergplassen_F_05_M

Sohlbergplassen Viewpoint

Sohlbergplassen Viewpoint

Sohlbergplassen Viewpoint

Smoke Shapes by Filippo Minelli

Filippo Minelli

Shapes, an ongoing project by Filippo Minelli is stunning.

Decontextualization of a violent tool changing quickly the surroundings, creating chaos, blinding the eyes, used in natural landscapes. The result proves that beauty can be found in clashing visions with an approach and aesthetic similar to romanticism. Showing the power of nature with the implication of religious aspects. Juxtaposing violence and beauty as a political statement. Giving silence a physical shape to be aware of its presence in the age of information and communication technology. The idea of ‘hidden manifest’ is contemplated in most of religions: Orthodox, Islamic, Catholic, Jewish mysticism, ‘Yin Xian’ for Taoism, and also in great philosophies like Buddhism.

Smoke Shapes by Filippo Minelli

Filippo Minelli

Filippo Minelli

Filippo Minelli

Smoke Shapes by Filippo Minelli

Smoke Shapes by Filippo Minelli

Smoke Shapes by Filippo Minelli

Smoke Shapes by Filippo Minelli

Penelopiad by Lightning & Kinglyface

Penelopiad by Lightning & Kinglyface

The installation Penelopiad by Lightning & Kinglyface uses a white, stretched canvas as a metaphor for human skin. Named after a novella by Margaret Atwood, the artwork fills the entire room, stretching from the floor to the ceiling, held down by eerie white hands. Referring to the narrative of Penelope who tricked herself out of marriage using a shroud, the piece represents the shrouds we weave around us, the lies we tell and the trouble or effort that is associated with them all in order to avoid entanglement.

She feared violence if she outright denied their offer of marriage so she announced she would make her decision on which to marry once she finished her father in law’s shroud. She enlisted twelve maids to help her unravel the shroud at night and spy on the suitors.  – Margaret Atwood.

(via Ignant)

Penelopiad by Lightning & Kinglyface

Penelopiad by Lightning & Kinglyface

Penelopiad by Lightning & Kinglyface

Fabulous Landscapes – an RGB Installation

Fabulous Landscapes - an RGB Project Installation

Milan-based creative team Carnovsky is a duo consisting of Francesco Rugi and Silvia Quintanilla. Recently, for Milan Design Week 2013, the team created this RGB installation entitled Fabulous Landscapes. The installation is a continuation of their ongoing RGB project, in which the artists experiment with layers of colors, both print and light, as they appear to the naked eye. Printing on walls with overlapping red, green, and blue designs, the artists then illuminate the room with either red, green, or blue LED lights to reveal one scene at a time.

The resulting images are unexpected and disorienting. The colors mix up, the lines and shapes entwine becoming oneiric and not completely clear.

(via My Modern Met)

Fabulous Landscapes - an RGB Installation

Fabulous Landscapes

Fabulous Landscapes

Fabulous Landscapes

Fabulous Landscapes

Fabulous Landscapes

Fabulous Landscapes

Fabulous Landscapes

Knit Fort Installations by Matt Gagnon

Knit Fort by Matt Gagnon

These Knit Fort installations by Matt Gagnon are gorgeous. Each installation is custom made to accommodate site conditions. The studio works with craftsman in Colombia to produce the hand oiled wood sticks for final assembly in Los Angeles.

Once inside the fort there is a surprising physical experience beyond the visual delight of dappled sunlight. There is a pleasant sense of feeling hidden while still being visible. As one relaxes against the surface it deforms and conforms to the weight of the lean. The organic form wraps the interior like a comfortable blanket. For the play version various panels can open and close to encourage interior/exterior game play.

Knit Fort by Matt Gagnon

Knit Fort by Matt Gagnon

Hanging Canvas Furniture

yoycanvas10

This Hanging Canvas Furniture created by Japanese design studio YOY is neat.

Constructed out of wood and and aluminum, the volume is covered by an elastic fabric, screen-printed with drawings of different types of furniture. The piece works when the frame is leaned against a wall, stretching when weight is applied, accommodating the user within the newly formed void. Available in three different sizes, the hanging seats come in stool, love seat, and sofa variations.

(via Designboom)

Hanging Canvas Furniture

Hanging Canvas Furniture

Hanging Canvas Furniture

Hanging Canvas Furniture

Hanging Canvas Furniture

Hanging Canvas Furniture

Wearable Foods

yeonjusungwearablefoods6

Wearable Foods is a series by Korean artist Yeonju Sung that presents a line of edible fashion. No need to worry about getting food on your clothes.

I create my own world of reality by generating a completely different set of images that contradict the conventional notion of food and clothes. As time goes by, the food from my work do go through a progression of disappearance due to the nature of food and gets gradually changed into the hideous state fading its shape and color in the process.

I drag out the types of images that can only exist in my mind and imagination into a reality and yet, it eventually disappears. I have physically made these images but they are the creation of illusion and ultimately what you see is the images of phantoms. My works remain as the medium of photographers, and it holds the time and makes us believe that the creation does exist in the real world.

(via My Modern Met)

yeonjusungwearablefoods1

yeonjusungwearablefoods3

yeonjusungwearablefoods5

yeonjusungwearablefoods6