At Rest by Emma Kisiel

emmakisielatrest7

At Rest, a series by photographer Emma Kisiel, features roadkill found on American highways that are finally given a floral and natural memorial without ever moving or repositioning the animals.

My images draw attention to the fact that, while man has a vast impact on animal and natural life, dominant American religions insist that animals do not have a place in Heaven and are, therefore, of little value in our society. To cause the viewer to feel struck by this truth, I photograph memorials I have built surrounding roadkill at the location at which its life was taken. At Rest expresses the sacredness to the bodies of animals accidentally hit by vehicles while crossing the road.

By surrounding the subject with living and fake flowers and stone markers, I elevate the often ignored and overlooked dead animal to the level of a human being and impart the beautiful grace of their fallen bodies. My photographs convey the sublime, the grotesque, and the lure of the macabre; we can hardly bear the visual of death, yet we cannot tear our eyes away.

(via My Modern Met)

At Rest by Emma Kisiel

At Rest by Emma Kisiel

At Rest by Emma Kisiel

At Rest by Emma Kisiel

emmakisielatrest5

emmakisielatrest7

This Land Is Your Land by Franck Bohbot

THIS CORNER ORCHAD BROOME 1

This Land Is Your Land by Franck Bohbot.

Franck Bohbot is a fine art photographer born in Paris based in New York City. This is a selection of the first part of his Serie “This Land Is Your Land”. His sens of composition and colorimetry are unique, and those unusual new york landscapes and buildings become monuments.

(via This is Paper)

This Land Is Your Land by Franck Bohbot

This Land Is Your Land by Franck Bohbot

This Land Is Your Land by Franck Bohbot

92b86389c30a8f42b5dd01f642128e43

601c236c77d43c4f1da1f32457635b74

981e6dca993bc10bedeb13d3e9e4ddf4

9091be1237136228135eabc70dff80a8

25437466b3106e1fde4cf25f23181cc0

c6a8eabf4e0cdea77affdc50f4726275

cc5c3ba6c347784d79b457b0c24b3d13

e4988c6746c15345c104bdf58eb895c0

THIS CORNER ORCHAD BROOME 1

It’s Hardly Noticeable by John William Keedy

KeedyPhotography11

It’s Hardly Noticeable, a photography series from John William Keedy.

It’s Hardly Noticeable explores the world of a character who navigates living with an unspecified anxiety-based mental illness. He negotiates situations constructed to highlight the impacts and implications of his differences on his thoughts and behaviors, and by doing so raises question of normalcy. Through constructed tableaus and metaphorical still lifes, the series reveals the relationship between reality and perception, and highlights issues of pathology while questioning stereotypes of normalcy.

In 2009 economist Bill Gross used the term New Normal to define the American economic landscape of the very recent past. In ensuing years, the term resonated with culture at large and became an umbrella term for changes in cultural and societal practices, identifying a shift in held notions of what is commonly viewed as acceptable.

These images question the legitimacy of applying the term normal in a societal context by prompting a reconsideration of what, if anything, is normal, or at least what is perceived and labeled as such. Is it possible for a society to have a commonly held idea of what is normal, when few individuals in that society actually meet the criteria for normal.

It’s Hardly Noticeable by John William Keedy

It’s Hardly Noticeable by John William Keedy

It’s Hardly Noticeable by John William Keedy

It’s Hardly Noticeable by John William Keedy

KeedyPhotography10

KeedyPhotography11

Derek Paul Boyle

boyle07

Interesting work from Derek Paul Boyle.

I am interested in the power of contradiction, the lure of anticipation, and incompatible states of the self – what was once bound is made free, the known made unknown. In a wavering step between angst and serenity, fear and pleasure, I want to give form to anxiety, a shape to tension.

(via Ignant)

Derek Paul Boyle

Derek Paul Boyle

boyle03

boyle05

boyle06

boyle07

Nice To Meet You by Martin Usborne

martin-usborne08

Nice To Meet You, a series by Martin Usborne.

Each image in this series is a portrait of a dog photographed through a material or substance: a wet pane of glass, faint smoke, dense material, bleeding light. Nearly all of the dogs are abandoned, untrained, often aggressive. One is a wolf. (Every dog was carefully handled and protected in the process). The images are titled with everyday phrases that so often hide subtexts.

(via Faith is Torment)

Martin Usborne

martin-usborne02

Martin Usborne

Martin Usborne

Nice To Meet You by Martin Usborne

Nice To Meet You by Martin Usborne

martin-usborne07

martin-usborne08

How to be Alone by Nich McElroy

Nich McElroy

How to be Alone by Nich McElroy.

Between 2008 and 2010 I spent my summers walking in the Chugach and Talkeetna ranges in south-central Alaska. Alpine tundra, glacial valleys, bad weather, mountain huts. We would get sopping wet and stay up talking to keep warm. For the two years I worked on How to be alone I guarded my time walking in the mountains; I would carry around a 6×7 camera the size of a cinderblock and try to depict the big, indifferent, beautiful things I was seeing. I didn’t bring the photographs back to fetishize solitude or wilderness, but to remind myself that I had found sufficient space to shut-up, look and listen.

(via This is Paper)

Nich McElroy.

Nich McElroy.

Nich McElroy.

How to be Alone by Nich McElroy.

How to be Alone by Nich McElroy.

How to be Alone by Nich McElroy.

Nich McElroy

Nich McElroy

Nich McElroy

Nich McElroy

Kalaripayattu Fighters

IMG_05931

Kalaripayattu Fighters photographed by Armand Poblete.

First I observed the light and the action of the fighters. The dimly lit arena just gave it that feel of an ’80s kung fu poster, and I wanted to keep it that way. After a few camera adjustments and a few hundred missed shots I finally captured the two fighters in midair.

(via National Geographic)

Kalaripayattu Fighters

IMG_05931

IMG_05473

IMG_03151

Kalaripayattu Fighters

Kalaripayattu Fighters

Conversations with History by David Emitt Adams

Conversations with History by David Emitt Adams

Arizona-based photographer David Emitt Adams uses a unique, 19th-century process to create detailed photographs on the bottom of tin cans. The project, entitled Conversations with History, compares the past and present of photography as it relates to the desert landscapes of the American West. Adams collects discarded cans, some dating back to the 1970s, that have been scattered across the desert.

For this body of work, I collect discarded cans from the desert floor, some over four decades old, which have earned a deep reddish-brown, rusty patina. This patina is the evidence of light and time, the two main components inherent in the very nature of photography. I use these objects to speak of human involvement with this landscape and create images on their surfaces through a labor-intensive 19th century photographic process known as wet-plate collodion. The result is an object that has history as an artifact and an image that ties it to its location. These cans are the relics of the advancement of our culture, and become sculptural support to what they have witnessed.

(via This is Paper)

Conversations with History by David Emitt Adams

Conversations with History by David Emitt Adams

Conversations with History by David Emitt Adams

Conversations with History by David Emitt Adams

Conversations with History by David Emitt Adams

Conversations with History by David Emitt Adams

Smoke Shapes by Filippo Minelli

Filippo Minelli

Shapes, an ongoing project by Filippo Minelli is stunning.

Decontextualization of a violent tool changing quickly the surroundings, creating chaos, blinding the eyes, used in natural landscapes. The result proves that beauty can be found in clashing visions with an approach and aesthetic similar to romanticism. Showing the power of nature with the implication of religious aspects. Juxtaposing violence and beauty as a political statement. Giving silence a physical shape to be aware of its presence in the age of information and communication technology. The idea of ‘hidden manifest’ is contemplated in most of religions: Orthodox, Islamic, Catholic, Jewish mysticism, ‘Yin Xian’ for Taoism, and also in great philosophies like Buddhism.

Smoke Shapes by Filippo Minelli

Filippo Minelli

Filippo Minelli

Filippo Minelli

Smoke Shapes by Filippo Minelli

Smoke Shapes by Filippo Minelli

Smoke Shapes by Filippo Minelli

Smoke Shapes by Filippo Minelli

Cody Cobb

1a_Island-119

Beautiful photography from Cody Cobb, an American photographer based in Seattle, Washington.

I usually have a vague idea of the topography and a detailed understanding of my route and orientation, but the light and landscape is always unexpected. I shoot when I feel moved by that sense of discovery.

(via Ignant)

Cody Cobb

Cody Cobb

Cody Cobb

Cody Cobb

Cody Cobb

Cody Cobb

1a_Island-104

1a_Island-106

1a_Island-109

1a_Island-111

1a_Island-113

1a_Island-118

1a_Island-119

Camera Obscura by Abelardo Morell

Camera Obscura by Abelardo Morell

Camera Obscura, a project from Abelardo Morell is exciting.

I made my first picture using camera obscura techniques in my darkened living room in 1991. In setting up a room to make this kind of photograph, I cover all windows with black plastic in order to achieve total darkness. Then, I cut a small hole in the material I use to cover the windows. This opening allows an inverted image of the view outside to flood onto the back walls of the room. Typically then I focused my large-format camera on the incoming image on the wall then make a camera exposure on film. In the beginning, exposures took from five to ten hours.

Over time, this project has taken me from my living room to all sorts of interiors around the world. One of the satisfactions I get from making this imagery comes from my seeing the weird and yet natural marriage of the inside and outside.

A few years ago, in order to push the visual potential of this process, I began to use color film and positioned a lens over the hole in the window plastic in order to add to the overall sharpness and brightness of the incoming image. Now, I often use a prism to make the projection come in right side up. I have also been able to shorten my exposures considerably thanks to digital technology, which in turn makes it possible to capture more momentary light. I love the increased sense of reality that the outdoor has in these new works .The marriage of the outside and the inside is now made up of more equal partners.

Camera Obscura by Abelardo Morell

Camera Obscura by Abelardo Morell

Camera Obscura by Abelardo Morell

Abelardo Morell

Abelardo Morell

Abelardo Morell

Abelardo Morell

New Yorkers by Daniele Testa

New Yorkers by Daniele Testa

New Yorkers by Daniele Testa.

With this project I try to emphasize the mood that pervades one person when a stranger asks him to pose for a portrait. In that instant, his mind begins to melt feelings: awe, distrust, worry, selfishness, ostentation, joy, confidence; all translated into the one most honest, genuine and unrepeatable, facial and bodily expression.

New Yorkers by Daniele Testa

New Yorkers by Daniele Testa

New Yorkers by Daniele Testa

New Yorkers by Daniele Testa

New Yorkers by Daniele Testa

New Yorkers by Daniele Testa

New Yorkers by Daniele Testa

New Yorkers by Daniele Testa

India Song by photographer Karen Knorr

India Song

Blurring the boundaries between reality and illusion, India Song is a magical series by photographer Karen Knorr.

Karen Knorr’s past work from the 1980’s onwards took as its theme the ideas of power that underlie cultural heritage, playfully challenging the underlying assumptions of fine art collections in academies and museums in Europe through photography and video. Since 2008 her work has taken a new turn and focused its gaze on the upper caste culture of the Rajput in India and its relationship to the “other” through the use of photography, video and performance. The photographic series considers men’s space (mardana) and women’s space (zanana) in Mughal and Rajput palace architecture, havelis and mausoleums through large format digital photography.

Karen Knorr celebrates the rich visual culture, the foundation myths and stories of northern India, focusing on Rajasthan and using sacred and secular sites to consider caste, femininity and its relationship to the animal world. Interiors are painstakingly photographed with a large format Sinar P3 analogue camera and scanned to very high resolution. Live animals are inserted into the architectural sites, fusing high resolution digital with analogue photography. Animals photographed in sanctuaries, zoos and cities inhabit palaces, mausoleums , temples and holy sites, interrogating Indian cultural heritage and rigid hierarchies. Cranes, zebus, langurs, tigers and elephants mutate from princely pets to avatars of past feminine historic characters, blurring boundaries between reality and illusion and reinventing the Panchatantra for the 21st century.

India Song

India Song

India Song

India Song

India Song

India Song

India Song

India Song