Kalaripayattu Fighters

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Kalaripayattu Fighters photographed by Armand Poblete.

First I observed the light and the action of the fighters. The dimly lit arena just gave it that feel of an ’80s kung fu poster, and I wanted to keep it that way. After a few camera adjustments and a few hundred missed shots I finally captured the two fighters in midair.

(via National Geographic)

Kalaripayattu Fighters

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Kalaripayattu Fighters

Kalaripayattu Fighters

Conversations with History by David Emitt Adams

Conversations with History by David Emitt Adams

Arizona-based photographer David Emitt Adams uses a unique, 19th-century process to create detailed photographs on the bottom of tin cans. The project, entitled Conversations with History, compares the past and present of photography as it relates to the desert landscapes of the American West. Adams collects discarded cans, some dating back to the 1970s, that have been scattered across the desert.

For this body of work, I collect discarded cans from the desert floor, some over four decades old, which have earned a deep reddish-brown, rusty patina. This patina is the evidence of light and time, the two main components inherent in the very nature of photography. I use these objects to speak of human involvement with this landscape and create images on their surfaces through a labor-intensive 19th century photographic process known as wet-plate collodion. The result is an object that has history as an artifact and an image that ties it to its location. These cans are the relics of the advancement of our culture, and become sculptural support to what they have witnessed.

(via This is Paper)

Conversations with History by David Emitt Adams

Conversations with History by David Emitt Adams

Conversations with History by David Emitt Adams

Conversations with History by David Emitt Adams

Conversations with History by David Emitt Adams

Conversations with History by David Emitt Adams

Smoke Shapes by Filippo Minelli

Filippo Minelli

Shapes, an ongoing project by Filippo Minelli is stunning.

Decontextualization of a violent tool changing quickly the surroundings, creating chaos, blinding the eyes, used in natural landscapes. The result proves that beauty can be found in clashing visions with an approach and aesthetic similar to romanticism. Showing the power of nature with the implication of religious aspects. Juxtaposing violence and beauty as a political statement. Giving silence a physical shape to be aware of its presence in the age of information and communication technology. The idea of ‘hidden manifest’ is contemplated in most of religions: Orthodox, Islamic, Catholic, Jewish mysticism, ‘Yin Xian’ for Taoism, and also in great philosophies like Buddhism.

Smoke Shapes by Filippo Minelli

Filippo Minelli

Filippo Minelli

Filippo Minelli

Smoke Shapes by Filippo Minelli

Smoke Shapes by Filippo Minelli

Smoke Shapes by Filippo Minelli

Smoke Shapes by Filippo Minelli

Cody Cobb

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Beautiful photography from Cody Cobb, an American photographer based in Seattle, Washington.

I usually have a vague idea of the topography and a detailed understanding of my route and orientation, but the light and landscape is always unexpected. I shoot when I feel moved by that sense of discovery.

(via Ignant)

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Cody Cobb

Cody Cobb

Cody Cobb

Cody Cobb

Cody Cobb

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Camera Obscura by Abelardo Morell

Camera Obscura by Abelardo Morell

Camera Obscura, a project from Abelardo Morell is exciting.

I made my first picture using camera obscura techniques in my darkened living room in 1991. In setting up a room to make this kind of photograph, I cover all windows with black plastic in order to achieve total darkness. Then, I cut a small hole in the material I use to cover the windows. This opening allows an inverted image of the view outside to flood onto the back walls of the room. Typically then I focused my large-format camera on the incoming image on the wall then make a camera exposure on film. In the beginning, exposures took from five to ten hours.

Over time, this project has taken me from my living room to all sorts of interiors around the world. One of the satisfactions I get from making this imagery comes from my seeing the weird and yet natural marriage of the inside and outside.

A few years ago, in order to push the visual potential of this process, I began to use color film and positioned a lens over the hole in the window plastic in order to add to the overall sharpness and brightness of the incoming image. Now, I often use a prism to make the projection come in right side up. I have also been able to shorten my exposures considerably thanks to digital technology, which in turn makes it possible to capture more momentary light. I love the increased sense of reality that the outdoor has in these new works .The marriage of the outside and the inside is now made up of more equal partners.

Camera Obscura by Abelardo Morell

Camera Obscura by Abelardo Morell

Camera Obscura by Abelardo Morell

Abelardo Morell

Abelardo Morell

Abelardo Morell

Abelardo Morell

New Yorkers by Daniele Testa

New Yorkers by Daniele Testa

New Yorkers by Daniele Testa.

With this project I try to emphasize the mood that pervades one person when a stranger asks him to pose for a portrait. In that instant, his mind begins to melt feelings: awe, distrust, worry, selfishness, ostentation, joy, confidence; all translated into the one most honest, genuine and unrepeatable, facial and bodily expression.

New Yorkers by Daniele Testa

New Yorkers by Daniele Testa

New Yorkers by Daniele Testa

New Yorkers by Daniele Testa

New Yorkers by Daniele Testa

New Yorkers by Daniele Testa

New Yorkers by Daniele Testa

New Yorkers by Daniele Testa

India Song by photographer Karen Knorr

India Song

Blurring the boundaries between reality and illusion, India Song is a magical series by photographer Karen Knorr.

Karen Knorr’s past work from the 1980’s onwards took as its theme the ideas of power that underlie cultural heritage, playfully challenging the underlying assumptions of fine art collections in academies and museums in Europe through photography and video. Since 2008 her work has taken a new turn and focused its gaze on the upper caste culture of the Rajput in India and its relationship to the “other” through the use of photography, video and performance. The photographic series considers men’s space (mardana) and women’s space (zanana) in Mughal and Rajput palace architecture, havelis and mausoleums through large format digital photography.

Karen Knorr celebrates the rich visual culture, the foundation myths and stories of northern India, focusing on Rajasthan and using sacred and secular sites to consider caste, femininity and its relationship to the animal world. Interiors are painstakingly photographed with a large format Sinar P3 analogue camera and scanned to very high resolution. Live animals are inserted into the architectural sites, fusing high resolution digital with analogue photography. Animals photographed in sanctuaries, zoos and cities inhabit palaces, mausoleums , temples and holy sites, interrogating Indian cultural heritage and rigid hierarchies. Cranes, zebus, langurs, tigers and elephants mutate from princely pets to avatars of past feminine historic characters, blurring boundaries between reality and illusion and reinventing the Panchatantra for the 21st century.

India Song

India Song

India Song

India Song

India Song

India Song

India Song

India Song

The Real Life Models

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The Real Life Models a series by Flora Borsi.

Nowadays almost every photographer use graphics software to complete the picture, like many painters used ‘original version’ in the past. Some artists use pure imagination to paint their artworks, others may prefer to create art by using a real life model as reference for the anatomy. What if these abstract models were real people?

The Real Life Models

The Real Life Models

The Real Life Models

The Real Life Models

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Mount Bromo by Helminadia Jabur

Mount Bromo by Helminadia Jabur

Beautiful photos of Mount Bromo on the Indonesian island of East Java by Helminadia Jabur.

The volcano is noted for its spectacular sunrises and majestic views all the way to Semeru volcano which is located further behind it. Ever since I saw some images of the volcano, I just could not help myself to visit the area and capture it.

(via Faith is Torment)

Mount Bromo by Helminadia Jabur

Mount Bromo by Helminadia Jabur

Mount Bromo by Helminadia Jabur

Mount Bromo by Helminadia Jabur

Mount Bromo by Helminadia Jabur

Mount Bromo by Helminadia Jabur

Micromachina – Photography from Scott Bain

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Enter the bizarre world of Micromachina in this photography series from Scott Bain.

Micromachina examines what makes the insect world tick, and considers our attempts to control nature and the consequences. Humanity’s blatant disregard for nature, where profit comes before life, will ultimately be our undoing. Pesticides, herbicides, genetic modification and massive urban expansion push the fine balance of life toward disaster. There has to be a point, when mother nature will say ‘too far’, and rid the earth of its biggest pest… us. When the planet’s soul is gone, all that’s left is cogs and pipes.

Photography from Scott Bain

Photography from Scott Bain

Photography from Scott Bain

Photography from Scott Bain

Photography from Scott Bain

Photography from Scott Bain

Photography from Scott Bain

Photography from Scott Bain

Duck Blinds

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Photos of structures common along the northwestern shores of Illinois where hunters can hide as they shoot ducks.

What I found interesting was how each blind possessed a style and character all its own, distinctly different and unique, but each hunter having to adhere to the same basic construction principles, while using similar building materials. The end results, while utilitarian in purpose, are always playfully creative and original. These photographs are a homage to their individuality.

(via Faith is Torment)

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Paths by Ruben Brulat

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Paths by Ruben Brulat.

Strangers that would be encountered along the way and willing to give themselves away to nature, resulting in a peregrination from more than a year, from Europe to Asia by land only, through Iraq, Iran, onto Afghanistan, Tibet until Indonesia, Japan and Mongolia.

Ruben searched for more far away lands, the unknown, in Paths, performing sometimes in welcoming sand, sometimes in the harsh snow, the just encountered fellows would let themselves go, opening their senses. Embracing everything that surrounds them. Ephemera intensity before saying, often, goodbye to each other forever. Placing the bodies of people there in part with these accidental and dramatic landscapes, like the trees, the rocks or the black sands of Gunung Bromo.

A narrative constructed only by the randomness of the encounter, places and body, meeting with utopia and hope in these only suspended moments. Bodies of people that became friends, performing, not without difficulties, leaving wounds, marks, and souvenirs from a time before heading towards different paths, after sharing one for a while.

(via This is Paper)

1_ Racines recherches

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Deserted States of America by Rob Hann

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Deserted States of America by Rob Hann.

I took my first photographic road trip in the American Southwest in October 2001. I had a long held and somewhat romantic fascination with the American road shaped by the books of Jack Kerouac and movies such as Paris, Texas as well as roots and rock music. Since then I’ve moved from England to New York City and whenever I can I head west to drive the vast spaces of the American deserts with my camera by my side hoping to find a little magic.

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Amazon Unpacked

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Amazon Unpacked from London photographer Ben Roberts.

I was sent on assignment by the Financial Times Weekend Magazine to photograph people and places in and around Rugeley. A former coal mining town, Rugeley has struggled during the UK’s current recession, with high unemployment being a particular problem. The arrival of Amazon to occupy a huge warehouse in the town was originally seen as being a boost to the local economy, but has it turned out that way?

Under pressure from politicians and the public over its tax arrangements, Amazon has tried to stress how many jobs it is creating across the country at a time of economic malaise. The undisputed behemoth of the online retail world has invested more than £1bn in its UK operations and announced last year that it would open another three warehouses over the next two years and create 2,000 more permanent jobs. Amazon even had a quote from David Cameron, the prime minister, in its September press release. “This is great news, not only for those individuals who will find work, but for the UK economy,” he said.

People in Rugeley, Staffordshire, felt exactly the same way in the summer of 2011 when they heard Amazon was going to occupy the empty blue warehouse on the site of the old coal mine. It seemed like this was the town’s chance to reinvent itself after decades of economic decline. But as they have had a taste of its “jobs of the future”, their excitement has died down. Most people are still glad Amazon has come, believing that any sort of work is better than no work at all, but many have been taken aback by the conditions and bitterly disappointed by the insecurity of much of the employment on offer.

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The Petit Prince

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The Petit Prince is a moving photo series by Slovenian photographer Matej Peljhan in which 12 year old Luke, who suffers from a severe form of muscular dystrophy and is unable to move independently, is able to do all the things he has imagined. Wonderful.

(via Colossal)

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Flower Portraits by Takashi Tomo-oka

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Flower portrait photographs from Takashi Tomo-oka.

I wish to express the beauty of ‘Kaboku’, which is to say, flowers and trees, using photographic techniques to create an image resembling a painting. I want to be able to feel the unadorned beauty of the plants, using a composition consisting solely of the plant and empty space, making the picture as simple as possible. There is a big difference between photographs and paintings. In painting the artist looks at the subject, considers it, then passes it through the ‘filter’ of his or her physical body to depict it; photography is much more direct. Photography cannot exist without a concrete subject (in my case flowers). There has to be something material in order for the camera to cut out a moment of its existence. When photographing plants, their natural power and aesthetics are expressed directly without passing through the filter that is me. I photograph plants that are on the verge of decay because they are beautiful. It is my ambition to capture the expressions unique to each plant. If you can feel the power of the plant, then my ability and individuality becomes almost unnecessary.

(via Designboom)

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